Apple Patenting a Way To Collect Fingerprints, Photos of Thieves

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Apple Insider: As published by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, Apple’s invention covering “Biometric capture for unauthorized user identification” details the simple but brilliant — and legally fuzzy — idea of using an iPhone or iPad’s Touch ID module, camera and other sensors to capture and store information about a potential thief. Apple’s patent is also governed by device triggers, though different constraints might be applied to unauthorized user data aggregation. For example, in one embodiment a single failed authentication triggers the immediate capture of fingerprint data and a picture of the user. In other cases, the device might be configured to evaluate the factors that ultimately trigger biometric capture based on a set of defaults defined by internal security protocols or the user. Interestingly, the patent application mentions machine learning as a potential solution for deciding when to capture biometric data and how to manage it. Other data can augment the biometric information, for example time stamps, device location, speed, air pressure, audio data and more, all collected and logged as background operations. The deemed unauthorized user’s data is then either stored locally on the device or sent to a remote server for further evaluation.

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FBI Finds 14,900 More Documents From Hillary Clinton’s Email Server

An anonymous reader quotes a report from ABC News: The FBI uncovered nearly 15,000 more emails and materials sent to or from Hillary Clinton as part of the agency’s investigation into her use of private email at the State Department. The documents were not among the 30,000 work-related emails turned over to the State Department by her attorneys in December 2014. The State Department confirmed it has received “tens of thousands” of personal and work-related email materials — including the 14,900 emails found by the FBI — that it will review. At a status hearing Monday before federal Judge Emmett Sullivan, who is overseeing that case, the State Department presented a schedule for how it would release the emails found by the FBI. The first group of 14,900 emails was ordered released, and a status hearing on Sept. 23 “will determine the release of the new emails and documents,” Sullivan said. “As we have previously explained, the State Department voluntarily agreed to produce to Judicial Watch any emails sent or received by Secretary Clinton in her official capacity during her tenure as secretary of state which are contained within the material turned over by the FBI and which were not already processed for FOIA by the State Department,” said State Department spokesman Mark Toner in a statement issued Monday. “We can confirm that the FBI material includes tens of thousands of non-record (meaning personal) and record materials that will have to be carefully appraised at State,” it read. “State has not yet had the opportunity to complete a review of the documents to determine whether they are agency records or if they are duplicative of documents State has already produced through the Freedom of Information Act” said Toner, declining further comment.

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The 50 Greatest Mustachioed Swordsmen In Screen History

Though we’re long past the age of knights in shining armor, everybody still loves a sword-swinging dynamo — especially one with well-groomed facial hair. For this list half-baked mustaches were docked serious points. And chinstraps? Please.
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AT&T, Apple, Google To Work On ‘Robocall’ Crackdown

Last month the FCC had pressed major U.S. phone companies to take immediate steps to develop technology that blocks unwanted automated calls available to consumers at no charge. It had demanded the concerned companies to come up with a “concrete, actionable” plan within 30 days. Well, the companies have complied. On Friday, 30 major technology companies announced they are joining the U.S. government to crack down on automated, pre-recorded telephone calls that regulators have labeled as “scourge.” Reuters adds: AT&T, Alphabet, Apple, Verizon Communications and Comcast are among the members of the “Robocall Strike Force,” which will work with the U.S. Federal Communications Commission. The strike force will report to the commission by Oct. 19 on “concrete plans to accelerate the development and adoption of new tools and solutions,” said AT&T Chief Executive Officer Randall Stephenson, who is chairing the group. The group hopes to put in place Caller ID verification standards that would help block calls from spoofed phone numbers and to consider a “Do Not Originate” list that would block spoofers from impersonating specific phone numbers from governments, banks or others.

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