Nintendo Offers Up To $20,000 To Hack the 3DS

Mickeycaskill writes: Nintendo will pay up to $ 20,000 for system and software vulnerabilities in the Nintendo 3DS family of handheld gaming consoles. The company is looking to prevent activities such as piracy, cheating and the circulation of inappropriate content to children. The stated goal is to “provide a secure environment for our customers so that they can enjoy our games and services. In order to achieve this goal, Nintendo is interested in receiving vulnerability information that researchers may discover regarding Nintendo’s platforms.” Silicon.co.uk reports: “Rewards will range from $ 100 to $ 20,000, with one given per ‘qualifying piece of vulnerability information.’ Hackers looking to claim a reward will have to provide Nintendo with either a proof-of-concept or a piece of functional exploit code in order to qualify.”

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Inside The $27,500-A-Month ‘Rehab’ For Stuck Millennials That Attempts To Turn Them Into Adults

No job, no property, no prospects? The Yellowbrick Treatment Center will help you with your “Problem” for a price.
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How Microsoft Lost In Court Over Windows 10 Upgrades

In June a California woman successfully sued Microsoft for $ 10,000 over forced Windows 10 upgrades, and she’s now written a 58-page ebook about her battle (which she’s selling for $ 9.99). But an anonymous Slashdot reader shares another inspiring story about a Texas IT worker and Linux geek who got Microsoft to pay him $ 650 for all the time that he lost.

“Worley built a Windows 7 machine for his grandfather, who has Alzheimer’s Disease, [customized] to look like Windows XP, an operating system his grandfather still remembered well…” writes Digital Trends. “But thanks to Microsoft’s persistent Windows 10 upgrade program, Worley’s grandfather unknowingly initiated the Win 10 upgrade by clicking the ‘X’ to close an upgrade window.” After Worley filed a legal “Notice of Dispute,” Microsoft quickly agreed to his demand for $ 650, which he donated to a non-profit focusing on Alzheimer’s patients.

But according to the article, that’s just the beginning, since Worley now “hopes people impacted by the forced Windows 10 upgrade will write a complaint to Microsoft demanding a settlement for their wasted time and money in repairing the device,” and on his web page suggests that if people don’t need the money, they should give it to charities fighting Alzheimer’s. “If Microsoft isn’t going to wake up and realize that lobbing intentionally-tricky updates at people who don’t need and can’t use them actively damages not only the lives of the Alzheimer’s sufferer, but those of their whole family, then let’s cure the disease on Microsoft’s dime so their tactics and those of companies that will follow their reckless example aren’t as damaging.”
Worley suggests each Notice of Dispute should demand at least $ 50 per hour from Microsoft, adding “If recent history holds steady they might just write you a check!”

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AngelList Acquires Product Hunt

Product Hunt, an online community of tech product enthusiasts, is no longer going at it alone. The three-year-old San Francisco startup said Thursday it is being acquired by AngelList, a popular crowdfunding platform for startups and angel investors. From a report on Fortune: Though Product Hunt is still a very young startup, it’s not hard to see why it made the move to sell to AngelList. Product Hunt debuted three years ago, almost to the day– founder Ryan Hoover and a friend, Nathan Bashaw, put together the original version of the website during the Thanksgiving weekend. Hoover had initially experimenting with sharing apps and other tech products with a small group of friends via email newsletters. The site quickly grew in reputation among Silicon Valley insiders and tech enthusiasts everywhere as a place to share and find new or interesting apps, gadgets, and tech tools. It even had a small job board, which was Product Hunt’s first source of revenue. Product Hunt also said it will continue to operate independently.

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